collaborations

COLLABORATIONS

Through consultation and or fabrication it is always a privilege for Prisms Glass – Beverly Bryon to collaborate with other artists on their projects; assisting to transform their ideas and designs into the magical medium of glass. These opportunities often present new challenges and refreshingly new ways of working.

‘The Meditating Brain’ 2014

Artist Tom Wilkinson
Royal Free Hospital

Tom Wilkinson was commissioned by the Royal Free Hospital, London, to create his concept of ‘The Brain in Meditation’, which was installed in September 2014. I was consultant and part fabricator on the project.

The stained glass image is of an actual MIR scan of a person in a state of deep meditation. A female member of the radiology department underwent the scan which was advantageous as she was familiar with the equipment.

There were over 600 complexly shaped pieces of glass which proved to be impossible to cut accurately by hand, so a water jet system of cutting was used.

As well as consulting on the project, I also soldered the panel together using the Tiffany Copper-foil technique to accommodate the intricate shapes.

Back lit on the wall of the Radiology Reception, it looks truly stunning.





‘Stations of the Cross’

Proposal for St. John’s Church, Bury St. Edmonds, Suffolk – 2006

Artist Mark Cazalet worked with Beverly Bryon producing two fused glass ‘roundels’ of one of his paintings for St. John’s Church. Left-hand side one is Mark’s and right-hand side is Beverly’s interpretation. Although Mark did not win the commission, it was an interesting experiment of the two artists working on the same image – and the different results.





‘Flight’ 2014

Artist Mark Cazelet

3 Stained Glass windows in Fraser’s Chapel Manchester Cathedral.
Panels 150cm x 200cm.



“Triptych of glass windows to accompany the trinity reredos in Fraser’s Chapel Manchester Cathedral.
Beverly acted as consultant, technician, cutter, fabricator and solderer. A wonderful collaboration that was very fruitful and enjoyable.”
Mark Cazelet